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Trinity College

ENVS 350: FIELD STUDY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE – Galápagos Islands

(Link: Trinity College Article)

  • Spring 2018, 14 students
  • I initiated this course, recruited select students, and found a non-profit education organization to partner with, Ecology Project International (EPI). Myself and another professor held informal weekly lunches throughout the spring semester to build a community with the students and together with EPI instructors, helped lead a 12 day trip to the Galápagos Islands. While on the islands, discussions centered on conservation, eco-tourism, and sustainability and we conducted marine censuses, helped collect data on Galápagos Islands tortoises, and eradicated invasive species.

ENVS 149: INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

  • Spring 2018, 29 students
  • Spring 2017, 29 students
  • “An introduction to interrelationships among the natural environment, humans, and the human environment, including the biological, social, economic, technological, and political aspects of current environmental challenges. This course focuses on building the scientific framework necessary to understand environmental issues. It explores the structure, function, and dynamics of ecosystems, interactions between living and physical systems, and how human enterprise affects natural systems. It also examines current issues regarding human impacts on environmental quality, including global warming, air and water pollution, agriculture, overpopulation, energy, and urbanization. The laboratory section, which complements lecture material, incorporates laboratory and field exercises that include a focus on Hartford and a nearby rural area.”

BIOL 333: ECOLOGY W/LAB

  • Fall 2017, 15 students
  • “A study of the adaptations of organisms to their environment and of the interrelationships among organisms that determine the structure and attributes of natural populations and biological communities. Field trips and laboratory exercises use sampling methods and statistical techniques to analyze the response of organisms to their physical environment, selected population phenomena, and different natural communities. Several field trips are required during the term.”

ENVS 110: THE EARTH’S CLIMATE

  • Fall 2016, 59 students
  • “The course will introduce students to techniques that quantify past and present climates and present a history of the earth’s climate throughout geologic time. We will discuss past and future climate change, its potential causes and effects on society.”